Taste the Difference

Taste the Difference

What’s a key marketing strategy that you can discover during a Scottish whisky tasting? Find out in today’s blog post from Roundpeg.

On my husband’s bucket list was a tour of distilleries in Scotland. He wanted to see how and where real whisky was made. And, so, a few weeks ago, I found myself wandering through distillery after distillery hearing about malting, mash and wort, the importance of good water, what temperature you have to roast the barley to and what it looks like when you add yeast to the mixture.

Overheard at the ‘Peg (#OHAtThePeg)

Overheard at the ‘Peg (#OHAtThePeg)

One of the things you notice if you spend any time at Roundpeg is the laughter. From stifled giggles to laugh-out-loud moments, there is a bit of laughter every day.
What makes us laugh? Animal videos of course, and other strange things we find online, paper airplane contests and jelly bean tasting events, the antics of Benny and Clyde and the silly jokes found on the inside of Popsicle sticks. Most of all, we laugh at the things people in the office say, whether they mean to be funny, and often when they don’t.
We think laughter should be shared and so, from time to time, you will see #OHAtThePeg in front or and the end of a particularly silly comment on Twitter.

Everything You Need to Know in 140 Characters

Everything You Need to Know in 140 Characters

Launched in 2006, Twitter changed the way we communicate. Well, maybe that’s giving Twitter too much credit. Maybe it changed communication, or maybe it simply reflected other changes going on at the same time as a plugged-in, mobile society looked for ways to get more information in less time. Either way brevity was in and long rambling text was out. Even 60-second sound bites and elevator pitches now seem too long as everything from company mission statements to personal bios have been reduced to 140 characters. While all of us struggle to be brief and yet interesting in many phases of our lives and business the Twitter bio is still one of the most challenging. In an instant, complete strangers read your bio and decide whether they do or don’t want to follow you. With so much to say, and so few words in which to say it how do you decide what’s in and what’s out? Look for inspiration in your Twitter Feed About once a year, usually when I update my profile image, I spend a little time thinking about my Twitter bio. If you didn’t know me, would it make you want to learn more? Does it really give you an idea about what you will find in my Twitter feed? Since I just updated my profile image (special thanks to Paul D’Andrea), I decided to rethink my Twitter bio, too, so I spent a little time looking for inspiration reading other Twitter bios. Here are just a few I found interesting. Who would you follow? Toot your horn with personality Jason Falls is a social media thought leader...
Headless Body in Topless Bar

Headless Body in Topless Bar

I am pretty sure you are reading this blog post because you saw the title and thought to yourself…WHAT????? And that’s the point. Great headlines make a reader stop and pay attention. That is exactly what this headline did when it appeared in the NY Post in 1983. Listening to an article about the author, Vincent Musetto, it occurred to me the medium has changed (there is no paper involved today) but the challenge is the same. As a writer, your job is to make potential readers stop and pay attention to what you have to say. In a digital world you need them to shift from scanning to reading. You do that with great headlines. So whether you are writing titles for blog posts, subject lines for email newsletters or text snippets for social media posts, you need to choose your words with care. There are no hard-and-fast rules for the perfect headline but here are a few of my favorite traffic stopping headlines from the Roundpeg blog and the strategy I used to create them. Surprise or shock Vincent’s headline certainly fell into this category. The title was so outrageous, you just knew the story would be as well. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) there aren’t many dead bodies floating around the world of internet marketing. You can however, still create a bit of interest using unlikely metaphors. Cocaine Marketing : It Takes More to Get High. This one surprised and even shocked a few people. Were we seriously talking about selling drugs? Lead with action Want a title which commands attention? Start the title with a verb. It...
123